Father Is in Town, 203

Lord, Got to Keep on Groovin’ at Temnikova & Kasela Gallery 0

Keiu Krikmann

Lord, Got to Keep on Groovin’
Temnikova & Kasela Gallery, Tallinn
February 8 – March 30, 2014

The Vienna-based artist Kris Lemsalu does not show her works in Estonia very often. She has been recognised in many parts of the world due to her unique sculptural installations and distinctive style, so now there’s a great opportunity to see her latest installation “Lord, Got to Keep on Groovin” in person.

Gelitin performing Loch, 2013

You are currently exhibiting the installation "Lord, Got to Keep on Groovin' " at the Temnikova & Kasela Gallery in Tallinn. The accompanying text describes the installation as "the return of psychedelia in the form of an assemblage" – could you talk a little how the installation came into being?

The show is a shrine for a dead friend. It was a long process that grew past the personal experience and readable in a wider context.

Your works seem to have a quite strong narrative component to them. Do you see yourself as a storyteller; and what are your stories inspired by, where do they come from?

I'm no storyteller, no narrative builder. I guess if people see an animal mask or a human feature the first thing is to rationalise it to some linear comfortable A to B logic, but it could be fun to step of out it, no pressure though…

Lord, Got to Keep on Groovin, 2014

To me the quality of materiality in your works is striking, it almost provokes a physical reaction in the viewer. Is that something you deliberately go for?

I do not pre-deal with the viewer that's not the way I work, but I do like physical reactions, please physical all over me.

You did your BA in ceramics but your installations feature a number of other materials as well – do you think the way you work with different materials has been influenced by your background in ceramics? How do you choose the materials to work with for each project?

The Idea is a independent lady and wears what she wants.

And lastly – you have shown your work in various parts of the world, have you noticed any difference in the way people relate to it?

[And here is the answer:]